ROBERT N. PEIRCE, JR. NAMED TO PENNSYLVANIA ELDER LAW TASK FORCE

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact:
Robin Rectenwald
412-471-2463
rrectenwald@jampole.com

Pittsburgh, September 17, 2013 - The Supreme Court of Pennsylvania has named Robert N. Peirce, Jr. to the Elder Law Task Force.

The mission of the Elder Law Task Force is to study the growing problems with guardianship, abuse and neglect, and access to justice that many older Pennsylvanians face. Members of the task force recommend court rules, legislation, education and best practices that will improve protection from abuse for the elderly.

The task force is split into three subcommittees: Guardians and Counsel, Guardianship Monitoring, and Elder Abuse and Neglect. Robert Peirce, Jr. is serving on the Elder Abuse and Neglect Committee.

"Our law firm is built on the foundation of giving strength and support to the injured and the abused, and empowering people to have a voice against those that do them harm," said Peirce. "We have a long history of defending the elderly from abuse, and I am very pleased I will be able to use my experience to help improve the law to better protect older Pennsylvanians."

Robert Peirce & Associates has more than 50 years of collective experience defending victims of nursing home abuse. In 2009, Robert Peirce & Associates was the first firm to get an appellate court decision permitting federal §1983 actions against nursing homes, a landmark decision that allows residents of county-run nursing homes to challenge the quality of their treatment under the provisions of the Civil Rights Act.

The U.S. Administration of Aging's National Center on Elder Abuse estimates that between 7.6% and 10% of elderly adults experienced abuse in the last year. For those with dementia, abuse is even more prevalent. A 2010 study in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society reported that 47% of participants with dementia had been mistreated by their caregivers. Unfortunately, research shows that victims of abuse, neglect and financial exploitation have three times the risk of dying prematurely.